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Can I just say, it’s been a hectic few months. Work and lack of internet connection at home have restricted my on-line activities, mostly this blog. 😛 I could have used my phone to update the blog but it seemed that the only time I had was when I was falling asleep!

The majority of my time was spent preparing for Blackstone Raids the last weekend of April. I taught a total of 3 classes that weekend. Two on spinning and one on Sprang. I had kits for each student- except for the hand outs which I still have not completed (Must get those done!!) Those who came to the spinning class also got a rundown of processing wool and left the class with 2 spindles, multiple samples of wool from different breeds of sheep, silk, Alpaca, flax and a bag to carry it all. For the Sprang class I had 9” x 18” PVC frames, cotton yarn, plenty of bamboo skewers for shed sticks, tapestry needles for sewing up the sides of the pouches, warping sticks and large bags to carry it all in. I really lucked out, the Dollar Tree had some nice bags in the sizes I was looking for to use with the classes. With everything that came in the kits the bags were a must. I will remember that for the next time I teach classes.

I set up the classroom early, due to my having so much stuff for the spinning class. The wool samples took up three tables, one table alone was for the full Dorset fleece that I had obtained just a few weeks prior and was still raw. The other two tables had more raw fleece and many samples of processed wools and the other spinning fibers. Below is one of the tables… Apparently I didn’t get pictures of the other two…(I must make sure to get more pictures next time!)

Table of spinning fiber samples.

Another table held various spinning implements….

Combs, cards, spindles, niddy-noddies and other goodies

And yet another table held samples of yarn from different fibers

Yarn-from left- Colored embroidery yarn, Merino, Coopworth, Jacob, Leicester Longwool, More Jacob, Mohair, Coopworth & Alpaca spiral blend and lastly two colored Alpaca

The Friday spinning class was small with just two ladies. A good start for testing out the set up and presentation. They seemed to enjoy the class and were happy with their goody bags when they left. I learned that I needed to plan my time better, work out the flow from one section to another. For the second class I made sure that participants selected samples and labeled their baggies while I was showing them the different types of fibers.

Saturday was my busiest day. The A&S display and Artisans Row was supposed to be at the main hall but when I got there to start set up it was over run with fencers! They had been rained out of their scheduled area (I didn’t realize at the time that they also had pavilions set up near the battle field!) I sacrificed the hall and had to split the Scriptorium hall (Where scribes were completing calligraphy and illumination for award scrolls.) for the A&S. Then part of that hall was taken over for a meeting… argh! Next time, if I’m in charge, I’ll make sure that there isn’t a repeat of this year…

I had barely enough time to get the room arranged with enough tables and chairs and get my display set up for the Artisans Row before I had to bolt over for my first class of the day. My display was essentially a “Sheep to Språng” set up showing the steps from raw wool, processing, spinning and ending with Sprang. Dummy me, I didn’t get any pictures., I really must remember to do so!!!.. Nor did I have any time to sit at my display and explain the steps… Blackstone being a 3 day event there just wasn’t enough time for me to teach 2 classes (both roughly 2 hours in length) and sit at the row.

As I was bolting from the A&S to the classroom I spied a Viking Lady in the market place who had a lovely Sprang pouch hanging from her brooches.  Of course I did an about face when my brain put two and two together and I stopped to talk to the lady and her companion and of course get a closer look at her pouch which was made from a thick wool and worked in patterned S & Z twist which formed triangle patterns.  Once again, I didn’t get a picture but the pattern was a series of triangles created by the directional change from S interlinking to Z interlinking.  Once I find a better depiction, probably one from the Collingwood book, I’ll post one.

Anyhoo, while speaking to them they mentioned that they would like to learn Sprang and I invited them to my class. I then had to dash off to the class which was getting ready to begin.  There were two ladies waiting there for me and shortly a 16 year old lord joined us and the Viking lady I had spoken to earlier.  It made me feel so good having them there for the class and we proceded to work on a Sprang pouch project worked in 1/1 interlinking .  I mistook my self and had them warp up only 20 strands for the pouches, when it should have been 40 to make the pouch wide enough to cover a water or pop bottle.  Several were able to complete their pouches in the time we had for the class which made me very happy with those results.  I explained that what they might view as ‘mistakes’ in the interlinking could be ‘design elements’ especially if it was worked as an entire row, or in one case, several rows.  I was able to get each back on track with the 1/1 interlinking while explaining what they had done in their ‘design element’ rows.  Once they reached the centers of their work I had them weave in 3 strands of yarn to secure the meeting line.  One lady misunderstood what I meant by ‘weave in’.  I had meant that the next to last row worked would have a strand of yarn placed across the working edges of the interlinking both at top and bottom, then another row would be interlinked and a final stand of yarn ran through that row. This secures the meeting line and the yarns sticking out from the sides can be tied into tassels.  This is a simpler method of finishing off than chaining the meeting line and handy if you don’t have a crochet hook handy.

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